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Morphometric analysis of septal aperture of humerus

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Int J Med Res Health Sci. |

Authors: Raghavendra K, Anil kumar Reddy Y, Shirol VS, Daksha Dixit, Desai SP
Int J Med Res Health Sci.2014;3(2):269-272 Abstract |  DOI: 10.5958/j.2319-5886.3.2.058

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Lower end of humerus shows olecranon and coronoid fossae separated by a thin bony septum, sometimes it may deficient and shows foramen which communicates both the fossae called Septal aperture, which is commonly referred as supratrochlear foramen (STF). Materials & Methods: We have studied 260 humeri (126 right side and 134 left side), measurements were taken by using vernier caliper, translucency septum was observed by keeping the lower end of humerus against the x-ray lobby. Results: A clear cut STF was observed in 19.2% bones, translucency septum was observed in 99 (91.6%) humeri on the right side and 95 (93.1%) humeri on the left sides respectively (Table – 1). Clinical significance: The presence of STF is always associated with the narrow medullary canal at the lower end of humerus, Supracondylar fracture of humerus is most common in paediatric age group, medullary nailing is done to treat the fractures in those cases the knowledge about the STF is very important for treating the fractures. It has been observed in x-ray of lower end of the humerus the STF is comparatively radiolucent, it is commonly seen as a type of ‘pseudolesions’ in an x-ray of the lower end of humerus and it may mistake for an osteolytic or cystic lesions. Conclusion: The present study can add data into anthropology and anatomy text books regarding STF and it gives knowledge of understanding anatomical variation of distal end of the humerus, which is significant for anthropologists, orthopaedic surgeons and radiologists in habitual clinical practice.

Keywords: Humerus, Sepatal aperture, Supratrochlear foramen, Medullary canal, anthropology

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